Predicate: know

Roleset id: know.01 , be cognizant of, realize, Source: , vncls: , framnet:

know.01: KNOW-V NOTES: Based on big corpus, comparison with 'say' and 'think'. Adjectival 'known' by Julia based on BOLT-6.(from know.01-v) KNOWLEDGEABLE-J NOTES: Added by Julia based on BOLT-1,
        know-v.01. (from knowledgeable.01-j) The frame file for this verb has been restructured by
        Claire. March 2015.

Aliases:

AliasFrameNetVerbNet
know (v.)Awareness Certaintycomprehend-87.2-1 conjecture-29.5-1 consider-29.9-1-1
idk (v.)
dunno (v.)
knowledge (n.)
knowledgeable (j.)Awareness
known (j.)

Roles:

        Arg0-PAG: knower (vnrole: 29.5-1-agent, 29.9-1-1-agent, 87.2-1-experiencer)
        Arg1-PPT: fact that is known (vnrole: 29.5-1-theme, 29.9-1-1-theme, 87.2-1-stimulus)
        Arg2-PRD: entity that arg1 is known ABOUT (vnrole: 29.5-1-predicate, 29.9-1-1-attribute, 87.2-1-attribute)

Example: know-v: just transitive

        I-1 need *trace*-1 to know the aircraft and flight number.

        Arg0: *trace*-1
        Rel: know
        Arg1: the aircraft and flight number

Example: know-v: sentential thing known

        The other side knows that Giuliani has always been prochoice.

        Arg0: The other side
        Rel: knows
        Arg1: that Guiliani has always been prochoice

Example: know-v: attributive

        He didn't know (anything) about most of the cases until Wednesday.

        Arg0: He
        Argm-neg: n't
        Rel: know
        Arg1: anything
        Arg2: about most of the cases
        Argm-tmp: until Wednesday

Example: knowledgeable-j: args 0, 2

        person: ns,  tense: ns,  aspect: ns,  voice: ns,  form: ns

        I 'm fairly knowledgeable about how the culture works in that part of the world , as is many of the experts .

        Arg0: I
        Argm-ext: fairly
        Rel: knowledgeable
        Arg2: about how the culture works in that part of the world
        Argm-adv: as is many of the experts

Example: idk-v: both args

        person: ns,  tense: ns,  aspect: ns,  voice: ns,  form: ns

        *PRO* Idk what I 'm going to do without you

        Arg0: *PRO*
        Rel: Idk
        Arg1: what I'm going to do without you

Example: know vs. know about, compare with .02 examples

        person: ns,  tense: ns,  aspect: ns,  voice: ns,  form: ns

        I know a lot about London. (I have read much about it.)

        Arg0: I
        Rel: know
        Arg1: a lot
        Arg2: about London

Example: Know TO BE, rephrasable as We know the truth of your words, ignore arg2 for AMR.

        person: ns,  tense: ns,  aspect: ns,  voice: ns,  form: ns

        We know [your words]-1 *-1 to be true.

        Arg0: We
        Rel: know
        Arg1: *-1 to be true
        Arg2: your words

Example: Know TO BE, more weird syntax for PB, ignore arg2 for AMR

        person: ns,  tense: ns,  aspect: ns,  voice: ns,  form: ns

        They know [the Cherokee Nation]-1 *-1 to be a sovereign state.

        Arg0: They
        Rel: know
        Arg1: *-1 to be a sovereign state
        Arg2: the Cherokee Nation

Roleset id: know.02 , kennen; be familiar with, have experienced, Source: , vncls: , framnet:

know.02: KNOW-V NOTES: Split off from the original .01 roleset by Julia for unification. KNOWN-J NOTES: Split off from the original .01 roleset by Julia
        for unification. Context may be needed to disambiguate senses .01 and .02 in some
        cases. The Little Prince example below may require knowledge that
        the Little Prince has visited this planet. This is a common
        distinction made in other languages such as German, French, Spanish,
        Italian, etc.

Aliases:

AliasFrameNetVerbNet
know (v.)Familiaritycharacterize-29.2-1
known (j.)
knowledgeable (j.)

Roles:

        Arg0-PAG: knower, person familiar with something (vnrole: 29.2-1-agent)
        Arg1-PPT: what arg0 is familiar with (vnrole: 29.2-1-theme)
        Arg2-PRD: what arg1 is known AS, or TO be, do, attribute (vnrole: 29.2-1-attribute)
        Arg3-CAU: what arg1 is known FOR

Example: know-v: just transitive

        I do not know him.

        Arg0: I
        Argm-neg: not
        Rel: know
        Arg1: him

Example: know vs. know about, compare with .01 examples

        I know London well. (I've been there many times.)

        Arg0: I
        Rel: know
        Arg1: London
        Argm-mnr: well

Example: know vs. know about, somewhat ambiguous

        I knew a planet that was inhabited by a lazy man.

        Arg0: I
        Rel: knew
        Arg1: a planet that was inhabited by a lazy man

Example: known-j

        Defendant is known to me and provided his name when I asked.

        Arg1: Defendant
        Rel: known
        Arg0: to me

Example: experience

        I have known hunger.

        Arg0: I
        Rel: know
        Arg1: hunger

Example: known-as

        Samuel Langhorne Clemens was known as Mark Twain.

        Arg1: Samuel Langhorne Clemens
        Rel: known
        Arg2: as Mark Twain

Example: known-for

        Mark Twain was known for the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

        Arg1: Mark Twain
        Rel: known
        Arg3: for the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Example: poetic usage

        Her love knew no bounds.

        Arg0: Her love
        Rel: knew
        Arg1: no bounds

Example: know-v: attribute

        [These nations]-1 are known *trace*-1 as "little tigers"

        Rel: known
        Arg1: *trace*-1
        Arg2: as "little tigers"

Example: know-v: infinitival attribute, contrast with sense 01

        I have never known a lady to faint in the belfry.

        Arg0: I
        Argm-neg: never
        Rel: known
        Arg1: a lady
        Arg2: to faint in the belfry.

Example: know-v: marginal usage, don't let the FOR syntax confuse you!

        Mary knows John for an idiot.

        Arg0: Mary
        Rel: knows
        Arg1: John
        Arg2: for an idiot

Example: known-j

        person: ns,  tense: ns,  aspect: ns,  voice: ns,  form: ns

        . China and India are both ancient countries with ancient cultures , and both have long histories and cultures ; the people of both nations are well known for being hard working , intelligent,and having a good natureed civilization , and have both been humiliated and invaded by foreign races .

        Arg1: the people of both nations
        Argm-ext: well
        Rel: known
        Arg3: for being hard working , intelligent , and having a good natureed civilizatio

Example: knowledgeable-j: all args

        person: ns,  tense: ns,  aspect: ns,  voice: ns,  form: ns

        Within those two incidents of which one is not aware, we become knowledgeable of them as primary forces in life.

        Argm-loc: within those two incidents of which one is not aware
        Arg0: we
        Rel: knowledgeable
        Arg1: of them
        Arg2: as primary forces in life

Roleset id: know.03 , have an ability, skill, or know-how, Source: , vncls: , framnet:

know.03: New sense added by Claire in AMR discussion March 2015.

Aliases:

AliasFrameNetVerbNet
know (v.)Awareness

Roles:

        Arg0-PAG: knower, person with an ability/skill
        Arg1-PPT: ability or skill

Example: skill as NP object

        I know Latin.

        Arg0: I
        Rel: know
        Arg1: Latin

Example: skill as how complement

        I know how to speak Latin.

        Arg0: I
        Rel: know
        Arg1: how to speak Latin

Example: with dances

        I know (how to dance the) Macarena.

        Arg0: I
        Rel: know
        Arg1: (how to dance) the Macarena

Roleset id: know.04 , recognize, differentiate, Source: , vncls: , framnet:

know.04: New sense added by Claire in AMR discussion March 2015.

Aliases:

AliasFrameNetVerbNet
know (v.)Differentiation

Roles:

        Arg0-PAG: knower, entity with ability to recognize/differentiate
        Arg1-PPT: thing recognized, first thing differentiated
        Arg2-PPT: differentiated-from, when separate mention

Example: with Manner

        The dog new his master by his voice.

        Arg0: The dog
        Rel: knew
        Arg1: his master
        Argm-mnr: by his voice

Example: with others

        The dog new his master's call from all the other voices.

        Arg0: The dog
        Rel: knew
        Arg1: his master's call
        Arg2: from all the other voices.

Example: with differentiated-from

        She doesn't know one end of the car from the other.

        Arg0: She
        Argm-neg: n't
        Rel: know
        Arg1: one end of the car
        Arg2: from the other

Example: recognize

        They know a tasty meal when they eat one.

        Arg0: They
        Rel: know
        Arg1: a tasty meal
        Argm-tmp: when they eat one.

Roleset id: know.05 , Biblical sense, to have sex with, Source: , vncls: , framnet:

know.05: New sense added by Claire in AMR discussion March 2015. Careful
        to distinguish from 02 sense.

Aliases:

AliasFrameNetVerbNet
know (v.)

Roles:

        Arg0-PAG: Knower, first sexual partner
        Arg1-PAG: Known, second sexual partner

Example: A special kind of familiarity

        Adam knew Eve.

        Arg0: Adam
        Rel: know
        Arg1: Eve

Roleset id: know.06 , discourse usage, Source: , vncls: , framnet:

know.06: New sense added by Claire in AMR discussion March 2015. Annotate sense for PB, drop from AMR.

Aliases:

AliasFrameNetVerbNet
know (v.)

Roles:

        Arg0-PAG: you, addressee

Example: Always arg0 only for PB, drop for AMR

        John, you know, is an alcoholic.

        Arg0: you
        Rel: know

Example: President Bush quote

        I just can't envision myself, you know, with a big straw hat and Hawaiian shirt, sitting on some beach.

        Arg0: you
        Rel: know